Clinical Trials

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Some of the oldest yet least publicized research points to the significant role regular exercise and an emotionally and intellectually engaging environment plays in neurogenesis: the ability of the brain to recreate new cells capable of restoring health to damaged CNS functionality.

Here are some postings on information regarding clinical trials.

Treatment Resistant Depression – NATIONWIDE (Clinical Trial 3783) (posted 12/2/2008

If your antidepressants have failed, you may be eligible to participate in a clinical research study, a new technology that uses EEGs to find medical treatment specifically for each individual. CNS Response is seeking volunteers for a research study of EEG-guided medication treatment for Major Depression

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bipolar/fmri at Stanford (posted 10/20/08)

Here’s your chance to make some money and get a free fMRI! Stanford University is currently seeking participants diagnosed with BiPolar I disorder for a study to evaluate how mood relates to thinking. They are paying participants $25 an hour.

You are not eligible for the study if you are on the following medications: Wellbutrin, Abilify, Propanolol, Mirapex, typical antipsychotics (such as Thorazine), stimulants (such as Strattera, Adderall), blood pressure medications, thyroid medication.

For more info, email Stanford.RewardsStudy@gmail.com or call Sarah Victor (650) 725-5970 to reach the study coordinator.  Please refer to the Rewards Study.

My Depression Connection lays out the pros and cons of participating in clinical trials and provides guidelines to assist you in participating.

Centerwatch trials for psychology and psychiatry and neurology

MayoClinic provides a listing of current clinical trials relative to the differing brain chemistry associated with various forms of depression. The clinic is also engaged in trials on Celexa and Lexapro.

George Washington University is conducting trails on treatment resistent depression,Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Bipolar and Depression Study.

NIMH reports on results of clinical trials


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